Rwanda 2017


Humanitarian Compendium

Total Requested:
$5,960,000
Total Funded:
$0
Percentage Funded:
0%

Despite the tragic 1994 genocide against the Tutsis, followed by massive Rwandan refugee outflows, over the past decade, Rwanda has been making  tireless efforts in reconciliation and nation building. As of today, Rwanda enjoys peace, security, political stability and economic growth.  However, even with the tremendous progress made, Rwanda is affected by multiple crisis – both man-made and natural disasters.

Due to the continued instability in the Great Lakes region, Rwanda has been hosting 73,894 Congolese for more than a decade and experienced a significant population influx in April 2015 caused by election-related crisis in Burundi. According to UNHCR, as of March 2017, the total number of refugees in Rwanda is 158,083 persons, which includes 84,666 Burundian refugees, 73,367 Congolese refugees, and some 50 refugees from various countries including Afghanistan, Angola, Central Africa Republic, Chad, Eritrea, Haiti, Kenya, Somalia and Uganda. Besides the influx of refugees and asylum seekers, Rwanda has received 20,000 returnees since 2013, many of whom are in need of reintegration support. Looking ahead, the UNHCR Refugee Contingency Plan estimates that 30,000 Congolese refugees as well as 30,000 Rwandan refugees, currently hosted in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, could potentially cross the border to Rwanda in 2017 due to increased violence in the Eastern parts of DRC.

Apart from the aforementioned man-made crisis Rwanda is prone to natural disasters, especially floods and landslides due to the country’s mountainous topography. In May 2016 floods and landslides resulted in the death of 50 individual and the injuring of 27, the same events also led to the destruction of over 2,300 houses. In addition, Rwanda is becoming increasingly vulnerable to the effects of climate change and is in result experiencing more frequent and severe weather conditions. The prolonged drought in 2016 and the severe rains in 2017 are great testaments to this - seven districts in the Eastern provinces of Rwanda affected by severe food insecurity. This is further aggravated by the droughts deterioration of already limited livelihood opportunities. In January 2017, over 1,000 houses were destroyed due to intensive and heavy rains.   

Despite the stable security and governance system in Rwanda the country is plagued by human trafficking and smuggling, to a large part perpetrated by global criminal networks. Rwanda is a country of origin, transit and destination for human trafficking, and has been ranked as a Tier 2 Watch List country in the 2016 Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report from the US Department of State. IOM is the leading UN agency in terms of counter trafficking programming in Rwanda. The Ministry of Gender and Family Promotion (MIGEPROF) is the key counterpart at the Government level, while IOM partners with UNICEF, UNFPA and UNWOMEN for the implementation of counter trafficking initiatives.

In Rwanda, IOM is leading the Shelter/NFI and CCCM sector in the natural disaster context. IOM is an active member of the UN Country Team and the UNDAP Results Group or DRG 1 (Economic transformation), DRG 3 (Health and Social Protection) and DRG 4 (Humanitarian Response, including DRR). IOM is a lead UN agency for the sustainable reintegration programme. Established in May 2012, DRGs (Development Results Groups) serves as programme and coordination mechanisms to enable the design, development, implementation, quality, coherence and consistency of programme activities leading to deliverying on UNDAP Results as well as monitoring and evaluation ofprogramme implementation and its contribution to desired results. For the Organizations in disaster response, the key counterpart is MIDIMAR at the national level and the local government at district level.  

Note: the projects above are in line with theBurundi Regional Response Plan (January - December 2017) developed by UNHCR in the absence of Humanitarian Country Team in Rwanda. Furthermore, IOM has included additional interventions that are in line with IOM’s Migration Crisis Operational Framework and country strategy to address migration issues and initiate development-principled programming to establish the foundations for longer-term recovery to complement its humanitarian programmes. These interventions are coordinated with the Government of Rwanda and at the inter-agency level.

Contact Information: Ms. Catherine Northing, Chief of Mission, cnorthing@iom.int, Ms. Eriko Nishimura, Project Officer (Emergency Response) enishimura@iom.int  or Project Officer (Counter Trafficking) Ms. Alia Hirji, ahirji@iom.int  Tel: +250 252 586 710   


IOM Offices: Country Office: Kigali; Clinic: Kigali; Presence in Ngororero District


International Staff: 5


National Staff: 31


Achievements:

In 2016:

  • Funded by CERF, IOM constructed a water supply system and health post in Nyarushishi Transit Center in order to improve the reception condition of Rwandan returnees upon their arrival.
  • Funded by USAID, IOM was the first UN agency to provide emergency response in the disaster situation after landslide disaster in Gakenke and other districts. IOM provided emergency cash for work to 889 disaster affected persons to support shelter construction.
  • Funded by CERF, IOM provided shelter / NFI support to the 1,265 disaster affected households (or 6325 individuals) in Gakenke district, and iron sheet provision to over 120 disaster affected households (600 individuals) in Ngororero district. IOM’s cash for work benefited to 1,133 skilled and 2,477 unskilled labourers and some 400 vulnerable families supported their house construction.
  • Funded by UNTFHS, IOM  provided market oriented skills training to 220 youth from vulnerable households who were exposed to the disaster risk in Ngororero District. 
Total Requested:
$5,960,000
Total Funded:
$0
Percentage Funded:
0%
Total Requested:
$5,960,000
Total Funded:
$0
Percentage Funded:
0%
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