Dominica


Humanitarian Compendium

Total Requested:
$2,272,400
Total Funded:
$1,093,870
Percentage Funded:
48%

Hurricane Maria made landfall on Dominica on 18 September 2017 as a category 5 hurricane with wind speeds of 155 mph. According to initial reports from the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA)1 , the entire country with a population of over 71,000 individuals has been significantly affected. To date, 27 fatalities have been confirmed by CDEMA. Flyover imaging and on-the-ground assessments have confirmed significant damages to housing infrastructures. The roofs of a significant proportion of buildings (up to 90% in many areas) have been partially or completely destroyed. Other buildings have completely collapsed and/or slid off their foundations, particularly in coastal/fishing villages where storm surges and flooding occurred. Although the clusters have not been activated, IOM is providing support to the Government of Dominica by coordinating the shelter and the camp coordination and camp management (CCCM) response in Dominica. Regular meetings are convened by the Deputy Local Government Commissioner in the capital Roseau on shelter strategy, technical guidelines, pipeline and response to date. An aerial survey conducted by the Pacific Disaster Center of 6,770 structures resulted in the following estimates: 10 per cent of structures slightly damaged, 28 per cent moderately damaged, 39 per cent highly damaged, and 23 per cent completely destroyed.

According to latest information tracked by WFP and IOM, there are currently 10,406 tarpaulins and 210 tents either planned, en route to or arrived in Dominica, brought by various shelter organisations and donors. In terms of non-food items (NFI), 3,680 blankets and 9,072 mosquito nets have been ordered by shelter actors. The government has endorsed the Collective Centre and Host Family Support Plan, which was developed with assistance from IOM and other shelter actors. The document prioritises helping households to leave the collective centres and host families, return to their homes, and begin the repair and rebuilding process.

Before the impact of Hurricane Maria, 143 buildings were designated as hurricane shelters (hereafter referred to as collective centres). To date, IOM and the Government of Dominica have gathered information regarding 78 of these collective centres. As of 30 September 2017, initial indications are that the 78 collective centres contacted to date are housing 3,044 individuals. The status and occupancy of the remaining 65 collective centres is not yet known; assessment of these centres is the priority activity for DTM assessments. Twenty of these centres are confirmed as damaged, but the assessment of damages is not yet complete. Additionally, unofficial collective centres and host family locations are being used by those displaced due to housing damage or destruction.

From 27—28 September, IOM conducted displacement tracking matrix (DTM) assessments in 14 collective centres in Roseau and the surrounding areas. The DTM is a system to track and monitor the displacement and population mobility. It is designed to regularly and systematically capture, process and disseminate information to provide a better understanding of the movements and evolving needs of displaced populations, whether on site or en route. Major issues reported at the collective centres included the lack of food and water, lack of mosquito nets and hygiene kits, absence of separated areas and privacy measures, and hygiene and solid waste issues. Most collective centres are schools, churches and community centres, and there is growing pressure for displaced people to find durable shelter solutions to enable services to restart. Most centres are not suitable for hosting displacement for an extended period, and many require significant repair work. 

Note: the projects below are in line with the Dominica Flash Appeal  (September - December 2017), as presented in more detail in the IOM Appeal Hurricane Maria - Dominica (September - December 2017). 

Overall Targeted Beneficiaries: 9,940 individuals


Contact Information: IOM Panama: iompanama@iom.int, +507 305 33 50; Preparedness and Response Division: prd@iom.int, +41 22 717 9271; Donor Relations Division: drd@iom.int, +41 22 717 9111  


International Staff: 5


Total Requested:
$2,272,400
Total Funded:
$1,093,870
Percentage Funded:
48%
Hurricane Maria - Dominica Appeal
Requested 2,272,400 | Received: 1,093,870 | Percentage funded: 48%

  Shelter and Non-Food Items

  • Support to shelter coordination
    Amount Requested: USD 60,000 Amount Received: USD 0
    Objective:
    Provide shelter coordination.
  • Early recovery support to the most vulnerable households
    Amount Requested: USD 120,000 Amount Received: USD 0
    Objective:
    Provide basic toolkits (either for each household or per neighbourhood) are required to enable repair work and construction of emergency shelters. Emergency shelter items will provide the immediate basis of early recovery, using an owner-driven approach.
    Beneficiaries:
    5,940 individuals
  • Emergency shelter, NFI and roofing kit distribution
    Amount Requested: USD 1,492,400 Amount Received: USD 1,093,870
    Objective:
    Enable those households whose homes have not suffered structural damage to the frame or foundations to return to their houses and begin repair. This support includes providing emergency shelter kits so that households can construct an emergency shelter near their home, critical non food items (kitchen kits, blankets and solar lamps) and roofing repair kits to construct a temporary roof on their home. 
    Beneficiaries:
    5,940 individuals

  Camp Coordination and Camp Management

  • Collective centre support and displacement needs tracking
    Amount Requested: USD 600,000 Amount Received: USD 0
    Objective:
    1) Improve the living conditions within the collective centres and host family homes and, 2) avoid the formation of displacement camps if possible. In order to achieve this, DTM assessments are rapidly identifying the location, population numbers, conditions and priority needs in collective centres, as well as the possibility for return. The return of as many people as possible will be reinforced through the emergency support from other sectors. For the remaining displaced population whose homes are too damaged for roofing kit support, the strategy is to host them in upgraded and consolidated collective centres. Collective centres will be identified so that they can be upgraded and provided with improvement works (e.g. solar panel installation, WASH repairs and upgrades, installation of privacy screens) and unsuitable collective centres will be closed. Upgraded collective centres will remain a disaster preparedness resource for future events, providing more suitable shelter in the event of an emergency.
    Beneficiaries:
    4,000 individuals
Total Requested:
$2,272,400
Total Funded:
$1,093,870
Percentage Funded:
48%
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